iPad Activity e-Recipes for College Classrooms

At today’s iPad faculty user group meeting Caroline demonstrated a handful of activities that could be implemented in the classroom relatively painlessly with the use of the CTL’s iPad cart. During her demonstration she highlighted the use of iPads for round-robin photo sharing, survey creation & field-based data collection, and digital storytelling.  Several examples were provided throughout the PowerPoint Presentation.

Also shared at the meeting were three e-recipe cards for setting up these activities in the classroom. The activity e-recipes are available as a Google Doc: http://tinyurl.com/ipadrecipes.

Consider trying one of these projects in your course! Make an appointment with someone in the CTL if you are interested in learning more or taking the next step: ctl@hamline.edu. Thanks to all who attended today!

Next month’s iPad faculty user group meeting will be on Tuesday, April 9 at 11:20 in BML 301. Please join us!

FiUG Meeting Feb. 12th 2013

Kathryn Malody talked about the successes and challenges of preparing and then utilizing iPads while abroad. She presented the peripherals to protect the iPads from the Jamaican climate while maintaining their functionality for an art and biology course. She also talked about the apps that they used. Ben Phillip introduced the SAMR model, which breaks down how technology can be leveraged on four different levels – as a direct substitution of existing technology, as an augmentation with slight improvements, as a significant modification of technology, or as a complete redefinition. A chart containing apps listed within these levels was also explored.

Both presentations can be found at:

http://bit.ly/ipadskathryn
http://bit.ly/ipadssamr

John Shepard shares two games on environmental education

StormDrainGoalieJohn Shepard shared two environmental educational games that are currently in development: Storm Drain Goalie and Estuaries in the Balance: The Texas Coastal Bend.

“The StormDrain Goalie project doesn’t have a web site yet and isn’t yet available in iTunes, though it should be within a month or so. The project’s elements include:

  • A simple game app that engages younger users in keeping common pollutants from washing into a storm drain while allowing untainted water drops to enter the drain. A Rogues Gallery about the pollutants and the importance of fresh water provides background information. This has been developed as a proof-in-concept application as part of a larger plan to add levels to the game and create additional, similar games on related issues. Continue reading

Exploding the Lecture

A great read in this week’s Inside Higher Ed. Are you ready to “Explode the Lecture” in Your Classroom?

by Steve Kolowich
November 15, 2011 – 3:00am

Personal narrative plays an important role in Mike Garver’s teaching style. Garver, a professor of marketing at Central Michigan University, often uses anecdotes from his own life in his lectures, according to one of his students. “It’s a good way to, in his words, ‘Put a movie in your mind,’ ” says Mike Hoover, a senior at Central Michigan, who is currently taking Garver’s course in market research.

Read more

Grading with my voice

Cross-posted on my blog: http://arundquist.wordpress.com/2010/12/11/grading-with-my-voice/

A few people have asked me for some more detail about how I use screencasting to grade papers so I thought I’d post this.

As a physics professor I don’t grade nearly as many writing assignments as my colleagues in other disciplines but I do take seriously my job to help all my students improve their writing.  When I first started grading such papers I would write comments on each draft and provides a grade via some sort of rubric.  The rubrics started really as requirements that could be met in various ways and have evolved to fully fleshed out rubrics with careful descriptions of what it takes to get a check mark in columns like “meets basic expectations”.

I quickly realized that giving the students the type of feedback I really thought they could use took a lot of time and effort, and I found that meeting with the students about their writing was one of the best ways to do this.  However, those appointments are hard to schedule, especially in a semester like I have now where all three of my lecture courses have heavy writing requirements (my First Year Seminar is writing intensive, my junior-level advanced lab course has writing a grant as 80% of the points, and my fully online course for teachers has a lesson plan as a major assignment).

I realized that the screencasting I was doing for my lectures could also be used to simulate the office experience with students.  I use my pen tablet mouse to mark up the documents digitally (using either Jarnal or Adobe Acrobat) and I use Jing to record my voice while explaining my concerns with the paper.  Here’s an example. In that example you can see how I mix in discussion of content, style, and how it meets the expectations.  You’ll also see that the 5 minute limit that Jing holds me too wasn’t enough (so I just did a second one).  Typically I get my comments done in under the five minute limit (though the reading of a typical paper still takes me something like 20 minutes).

I ride the bus a lot and I like to use that time to grade.  What I’ve taken to doing is marking up the papers in regular ink with little notations to myself about what to say.  When I’m back in my office I then open the digital document, grab my pen tablet, and begin.  I transfer the marks that are necessary all the while holding a pseudo conversation with the student.

I’ve gotten a lot of good feedback about this from my students.  They really like having the screencast at their disposal for pausing and rewinding.  One student told me that he opens his paper on his computer before playing the screencast and he makes changes immediately, while pausing the playback.  Others have said that they really feel they understand what I’m looking for after watching.  There’s also been an interesting study on the preferences of students for the type of feedback they’d like, comparing regular comments, track-changes in Word, track changes with audio, and what I do.   The upshot is that my way was strongly preferred in their survey.

I’d love to hear how others use a similar system.  Feel free to drop me a line here in the comments or on twitter @arundquist.